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Fasting Serum Insulin

(ideal range is 0-15 mcIU/ml)

Insulin levels should be taken following a 12 hour fast and also 2 hours post-prandial (following a meal). The intake of excess calories and refined carbohydrates over a period of time will repeatedly stimulate insulin release and leads to dysinsulinemia. Prolonged dysinsulinemia then leads eventually to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is generally associated with a relative glucose intolerance elevated triglyceride levels, central obesity, hypertension low levels of HDL, and elevated uric acid.

The phenomenon of insulin resistance (Metabolic syndrome) then increases the risk of developing diabetes Type II, obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, malignancies, chronic inflammatory states.

If the patient exhibits an elevated fasting serum insuin level:

We may suspect the clinical condition called Metabolic syndrome. There is certainly a higher insulin output that may lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. This will likewise, increase cardiovascular risk.

The following nutritional agents may be considered for those patients exhibiting elevated, fasting insulin levels:

Increase exercise. Even moderate exercise will improve one’s insulin sensitivity.

Increase mineral intake of chromium, magnesium, vanadium, and zinc that are all important for the efficient manufacture and use of insulin (see details discussed above in the glucose section)

Gluco-Control — 1 tablet 3 times daily

Increase B complex biotin, and inositol for improved insulin response (again, see above)

If the patient exhibits a low fasting serum insulin level:

We may suspect the clinical condition of Type I diabetes mellitus with an associated elevation in fasting glucose or the phenomenon may in fact be a benign individual pattern.

The following nutritional agents may be considered for those patients exhibiting a low, fasting insulin level:

Increase the same minerals listed above

L-arginine

Botanicals: Gymnema S. Trigonella f. (fenugreek seeds) and insulin-mimetics such as Momordica c. (bitter melon)

If the patient exhibits an elevated 2 hour post-prandial serum insulin:

The patient may have Metabolic syndrome/Insulin resistance or possibly, if already clinically a Type I diabetic, they may require an adjustment of their insulin dosing.

The following nutritional agents may be considered for those patients exhibiting an elevated 2 hour post-prandial serum insulin:

Again, increase those minerals and vitamins listed above

N-acetylcysteine

NAC-600 — 1-2 capsules twice daily in between meals)

Dietary: lower the caloric intake, increase fiber, and consume fewer concentrated carbs

Exercise

If the patient exhibits a decreased 2 hour post-prandial serum insulin:

The patient may either be a Type I diabetes mellitus individual or simply possesses a benign idiopathic decreased insulin event.

The following nutritional agents may be considered for those patients exhibiting a decreased 2 hour, post-prandial serum insulin:

Antioxidant support for the pancreatic islet cells (especially if recent onset) including vitamin E, C, carotenoids, selenium, and taurine.

Oxypro — 3-6 tablets daily

Botanicals: bitter melons, fenugreek seeds, green tea, all may improve insulin output

Increase exercise.